International Journal of Comparative Education and Development (2023)

Description

The International Journal of Comparative Education and Development (IJCED) is a quarterly journal devoted to addressing current issues and future developments in international comparative education. The journal invites contributions from across the globe and related academic disciplines.

The journal is intended to be a vehicle for scholarly presentation and dissemination of theoretical and applied contributions to approaches and research related to international comparative education with units of comparison such as time-history, sociology, national and international policies and systems, cultures, minorities, critical discourse and philosophy. The journal is a venue for research studies, critical essays, and reviews.

Manuscripts’ main topic must be in international comparative education with sub-areas including, but not limited to:

  • Educational Policy and Administration
  • Citizenship and Globalization
  • Internationalization of Education
  • Diversity and Multiculturalism
  • Sustainable Development
  • Higher Education
  • Gender and Equity
  • Critical Discourse

IJCEDadopts a double-blind peer-review policy, contributed by international reviewers.

Special issues must have pre-approved specific themes with guest editors leading the editorial process.Links to the proposal form and information about being a guest editor can be found at the bottom of the following page: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/our-services/journal-editors/your-editorial-team.

  • Editor-in-Chief

    • JaePark
      The Education University of Hong Kong -Hong Kong
      [emailprotected]
  • Managing Editor

    • AnselmoBae
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
      [emailprotected]
  • Associate Editor

    • Yeow-TongChia
      University of Sydney-Australia
    • Tae HeeChoi
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • JingLiu
      Tohoku University-Japan
    • PengLiu
      University of Manitoba -Canada
    • DavidSorrell
      Education Consultant-Hong Kong
  • Commissioning Editor

    • DanielleCrow
      Emerald Publishing-UK
      [emailprotected]
  • Journal Editorial Office (For queries related to pre-acceptance)

    • ManmeetKumar
      Emerald Publishing
      [emailprotected]
  • Supplier Project Manager (For queries related to post-acceptance)

    • AbinayaJegadhesan
      Emerald Publishing
      [emailprotected]
  • Editorial Advisory Board

    • BobAdamson
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • WillBrehm
      University College London-UK
    • TristanBunnell
      University of Bath-UK
    • I-Ru DorothyChen
      National Chi Nan University-Taiwan
    • SicongChen
      Kyushu University -Japan
    • AngelaDaly
      Liverpool John Moores University-UK
    • NaruhoEzaki
      Aichi Shukutoku University -Japan
    • AlexanderGardner-McTaggart
      Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester-UK
    • RuthHayhoe
      University of Toronto-Canada
    • LizJackson
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • RevaJoshee
      University of Toronto-Canada
    • ShahidKarim
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • KevinKester
      Seoul National University-South Korea
    • KennethKing
      University of Edinburgh-UK
    • Jia ChengLI
      East China Normal University-People's Republic of China
    • Moo SungLee
      University of Canberra-Australia
    • Wing OnLee
      Singapore University of Social Sciences -Singapore
    • Ji’anLiu
      University of Chinese Academy of Sciences-People's Republic of China
    • ShuiyunLiu
      Beijing Normal University-People's Republic of China
    • Will Yat WaiLo
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • MitsukoMaeda
      Osaka Jogakuin University-Japan
    • MariaManzon
      Sophia University-Japan
    • PaulNewton
      University of Saskatchewan-Canada
    • JonNixon
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • Le-HaPhan
      Universiti Brunei Darussalam - Brunei and University of Hawaii-USA
    • YaminQian
      Guangdong Foreign Studies University-People's Republic of China
    • ShelleyannScott
      University of Calgary-Canada
    • XiaoyangWang
      Tsing Hua University-People's Republic of China
    • BillyWong
      University of Reading-UK
    • JintingWu
      University at Buffalo, State University of New York-USA
    • CoraXu
      Durham University-UK
    • LanYang
      The Education University of Hong Kong-Hong Kong
    • JingshunZhang
      Florida Gulf Coast University-USA

Before you start

For queries relating to the status of your paper pre decision, please contact the Editor or Journal Editorial Office. For queries post acceptance, please contact the Supplier Project Manager. These details can be found in the Editorial Team section.

(Video) International Comparative Education

Author responsibilities

Our goal is to provide you with a professional and courteous experience at each stage of the review and publication process. There are also some responsibilities that sit with you as the author. Our expectation is that you will:

  • Respond swiftly to any queries during the publication process.
  • Be accountable for all aspects of your work. This includes investigating and resolving any questions about accuracy or research integrity
  • Treat communications between you and the journal editor as confidential until an editorial decision has been made.
  • Read about our research ethics for authorship.These state that you must:
    • Include anyone who has made a substantial and meaningful contribution to the submission (anyone else involved in the paper should be listed in the acknowledgements).
    • Exclude anyone who hasn’t contributed to the paper, or who has chosen not to be associated with the research.
  • If your article involves human participants, you must ensure you have considered whether or not you require ethical approval for your research, and include this information as part of your submission. Find out more about informed consent.

Research and publishing ethics

Our editors and employees work hard to ensure the content we publish is ethically sound. To help us achieve that goal, we closely follow the advice laid out in the guidelines and flowcharts on the COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics) website.

We have also developed our research and publishing ethics guidelines. If you haven’t already read these, we urge you to do so – they will help you avoid the most common publishing ethics issues.

A few key points:

  • Any manuscript you submit to this journal should be original. That means it should not have been published before in its current, or similar, form. Exceptions to this rule are outlined in our pre-print and conference paper policies. If any substantial element of your paper has been previously published, you need to declare this to the journal editor upon submission. Please note, the journal editor may useCrossref Similarity Checkto check on the originality of submissions received. This service compares submissions against a database of 49 million works from 800 scholarly publishers.
  • Your work should not have been submitted elsewhere and should not be under consideration by any other publication.
  • If you have a conflict of interest, you must declare it upon submission; this allows the editor to decide how they would like to proceed. Read about conflict of interest in our research and publishing ethics guidelines.
  • By submitting your work to Emerald, you are guaranteeing that the work is not in infringement of any existing copyright.

Third party copyright permissions

Prior to article submission, you need to ensure you’ve applied for, and received, written permission to use any material in your manuscript that has been created by a third party. Please note, we areunable to publish any article that still has permissions pending.The rights we requireare:

  • Non-exclusive rights to reproduce the material in the article or book chapter.
  • Print and electronic rights.
  • Worldwide English-language rights.
  • To use the material for the life of the work. That means there should be no time restrictions on its re-use e.g. a one-year licence.

We area member of theInternational Association of Scientific, Technical, and Medical Publishers(STM)and participatein the STM permissions guidelines, a reciprocal free exchange of material with other STM publishers. In some cases, this may mean that you don’t need permission to re-use content.If so, please highlight this at the submission stage.

Please take a few moments to read our guide to publishing permissionsto ensure you have met all the requirements, so that we can process your submission without delay.

Open access submissions and information

All our journals currently offer two open access (OA) publishing paths; gold open access and green open access.

If you would like to, or are required to, make the branded publisher PDF (also known as the version of record) freely available immediately upon publication, you should select the gold open access route during the submission process.

If you’ve chosen to publish gold open access, this is the point you will be asked to pay the APC (article processing charge). This varies per journal and can be found on our APC price list or on the editorial system at the point of submission. Your article will be published with a Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 user licence, which outlines how readers can reuse your work.

Alternatively, if you would like to, or are required to, publish open access but your funding doesn’t cover the cost of the APC, you can choose the green open access, or self-archiving, route. As soon as your article is published, you can make the author accepted manuscript (the version accepted for publication) openly available, free from payment and embargo periods.

For UK journal article authors - if you wish to submit your work accepted by us to REF 2021, you must make a ’closed deposit’ of your accepted manuscript to your respective institutional repository upon acceptance of your article. Articles accepted for publication after 1st April 2018 should be deposited as soon as possible, but no later than three months after the acceptance date. For further information and guidance, please refer to the REF 2021 website.

You can find out more about our open access routes, our APCs and waivers and read our FAQson our open research page.

Find out about open

Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines

We are a signatory of the Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, a framework that supports the reproducibility of research through the adoption of transparent research practices. That means we encourage you to:

  • Cite and fully reference all data, program code, and other methods in your article.
  • Include persistent identifiers, such as a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), in references for datasets and program codes. Persistent identifiers ensure future access to unique published digital objects, such as a piece of text or datasets. Persistent identifiers are assigned to datasets by digital archives, such as institutional repositories and partners in the Data Preservation Alliance for the Social Sciences (Data-PASS).
  • Follow appropriate international and national procedures with respect to data protection, rights to privacy and other ethical considerations, whenever you cite data. For further guidance please refer to ourresearch and publishing ethics guidelines. For an example on how to cite datasets, please refer to the referencessection below.

Prepare your submission

Manuscript support services

We arepleased to partner withEditage,a platform that connects you with relevant experts in language support, translation, editing, visuals, consulting, and more. After you’ve agreed a fee, they will work with you to enhance your manuscript and get it submission-ready.

This is an optional service for authors who feel they need a little extra support. It does not guarantee your work will be accepted for review or publication.

Visit Editage

(Video) Intro to Comparative and International Education

Manuscript requirements

Before you submit your manuscript, it’s important you read and follow the guidelines below. You will also find some useful tips in our structureyour journal submission how-to guide.

Format

Article files should be provided in Microsoft Word format

While you are welcome to submit a PDF of the document alongside the Word file, PDFs alone are not acceptable. LaTeX files can also be used but only if an accompanying PDF document is provided. Acceptable figure file types are listed further below.

Article length / word count

Articles should be between 6000 and 8000 words in length. This includes all text, for example, the structured abstract, references, all text in tables, and figures and appendices.

Please allow 280 words for each figure or table.

Article title

A concisely worded title should be provided.

Author details

The names of all contributing authors should be added to the ScholarOne submission; please list them in the order in which you’d like them to be published. Each contributing author will need their own ScholarOne author account, from which we will extract the following details:

  • Author email address (institutional preferred).
  • Author name. We will reproduce it exactly, so any middle names and/or initials they want featured must be included.
  • Author affiliation. This should be where they were based when the research for the paper was conducted.

In multi-authored papers, it’s important that ALL authors that have made a significant contribution to the paper are listed. Those who have provided support but have not contributed to the research should be featured in an acknowledgements section. You should never include people who have not contributed to the paper or who don’t want to be associated with the research. Read about our research ethics for authorship.

Biographies and acknowledgements

If you want to include these items, save them in a separate MicrosoftWord document and upload the file with your submission. Where they are included, a brief professional biography of not more than 100 words should be supplied for each named author.

Research funding

Your article must reference all sources of external research funding in the acknowledgements section. You should describe the role of the funder or financial sponsor in the entire research process, from study design to submission.

Structured abstract

All submissions must include a structured abstract, following the format outlined below.

These four sub-headings and their accompanying explanations must always be included:

  • Purpose
  • Design/methodology/approach
  • Findings
  • Originality

The following three sub-headings are optional and can be included, if applicable:

  • Research limitations/implications
  • Practical implications
  • Social implications


You can find some useful tips in our writean article abstracthow-to guide.

The maximum length of your abstract should be 250 words in total, including keywords and article classification (see the sections below).

Keywords

Your submission should include up to 12 appropriate and short keywords that capture the principal topics of the paper. Our Creating an SEO-friendly manuscripthow to guide contains some practical guidance on choosing search-engine friendly keywords.

Please note, while we will always try to use the keywords you’ve suggested, the in-house editorial team may replace some of them with matching terms to ensure consistency across publications and improve your article’s visibility.

Article classification

During the submission process, you will be asked to select a type for your paper; the options are listed below. If you don’t see an exact match, please choose the best fit:

  • Research Paper
  • Practitioner Paper
  • Review Paper
  • Book Review

You will also be asked to select a category for your paper. The options for this are listed below. If you don’t see an exact match, please choose the best fit:

Research paper.Reports on any type of research undertaken by the author(s), including:

  • The construction or testing of a model or framework
  • Action research
  • Testing of data, market research or surveys
  • Empirical, scientific or clinical research
  • Papers with a practical focus

Viewpoint.Covers any paper where content is dependent on the author's opinion and interpretation. This includes journalistic and magazine-style pieces.

Technical paper.Describes and evaluates technical products, processes or services.

Conceptual paper.Focuses on developing hypotheses and is usually discursive. Covers philosophical discussions and comparative studies of other authors’ work and thinking.

Case study.Describes actual interventions or experiences within organizations. It can be subjective and doesn’t generally report on research. Also covers a description of a legal case or a hypothetical case study used as a teaching exercise.

Literature review.This category should only be used if the main purpose of the paper is to annotate and/or critique the literature in a particular field. It could be a selective bibliography providing advice on information sources, or the paper may aim to cover the main contributors to the development of a topic and explore their different views.

General review.Provides an overview or historical examination of some concept, technique or phenomenon. Papers are likely to be more descriptive or instructional (‘how to’ papers) than discursive.

Headings

Headings must be concise, with a clear indication of the required hierarchy.

The preferred format is for first level headings to be in bold, and subsequent sub-headings to be in medium italics.

Notes/endnotes

Notes or endnotes should only be used if absolutely necessary. They should be identified in the text by consecutive numbers enclosed in square brackets. These numbers should then be listed, and explained, at the end of the article.

Figures

All figures (charts, diagrams, line drawings, webpages/screenshots, and photographic images) should be submitted electronically. Both colour and black and white files are accepted.

There are a few other important points to note:

  • All figures should be supplied at the highest resolution/quality possible with numbers and text clearly legible.
  • Acceptable formats are .ai, .eps, .jpeg, .bmp, and .tif.
  • Electronic figures created in other applications should be supplied in their original formats and should also be either copied and pasted into a blank MS Word document, or submitted as a PDF file.
  • All figures should be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals and have clear captions.
  • All photographs should be numbered as Plate 1, 2, 3, etc. and have clear captions.

Tables

Tables should be typed and submitted in a separate file to the main body of the article. The position of each table should be clearly labelled in the main body of the article with corresponding labels clearly shown in the table file. Tables should be numbered consecutively in Roman numerals (e.g. I, II, etc.).

Give each table a brief title. Ensure that any superscripts or asterisks are shown next to the relevant items and have explanations displayed as footnotes to the table, figure or plate.

Supplementary files

Where tables, figures, appendices, and other additional content are supplementary to the article but not critical to the reader’s understanding of it, you can choose to host these supplementary files alongside your article on Insight, Emerald’s content hosting platform, or on an institutional or personal repository. All supplementary material must be submitted prior to acceptance.

If you choose to host your supplementary files on Insight, you must submit these as separate files alongside your article. Files should be clearly labelled in such a way that makes it clear they are supplementary; Emerald recommends that the file name is descriptive and that it follows the format ‘Supplementary_material_appendix_1’ or ‘Supplementary tables’. All supplementary material must be mentioned at the appropriate moment in the main text of the article, there is no need to include the content of the file but only the file name. A link to the supplementary material will be added to the article during production, and the material will be made available alongside the main text of the article at the point of EarlyCite publication.

Please note that Emerald will not make any changes to the material; it will not be copyedited, typeset, and authors will not receive proofs. Emerald therefore strongly recommends that you style all supplementary material ahead of acceptance of the article.

Emerald Insight can host the following file types and extensions:

  • Adobe Acrobat (.pdf)
  • MS Word document (.doc, .docx)
  • MS Excel (.xls, xlsx)
  • MS PowerPoint (.pptx)
  • Image (.png, .jpeg, .gif)
  • Plain ASCII text (.txt)
  • PostScript (.ps)
  • Rich Text Format (.rtf)

If you choose to use an institutional or personal repository, you should ensure that the supplementary material is hosted on the repository ahead of submission, and then include a link only to the repository within the article. It is the responsibility of the submitting author to ensure that the material is free to access and that it remains permanently available.

Please note that extensive supplementary material may be subject to peer review; this is at the discretion of the journal Editor and dependent on the content of the material (for example, whether including it would support the reviewer making a decision on the article during the peer review process).

References

All references in your manuscript must be formatted using one of the recognised Harvard styles. You are welcome to use the Harvard style Emerald has adopted – we’ve provided a detailed guide below. Want to use a different Harvard style? That’s fine, our typesetters will make any necessary changes to your manuscript if it is accepted. Please ensure you check all your citations forcompleteness, accuracy and consistency.

Emerald’s Harvard referencing style

References to other publications in your text should be written as follows:

  • Single author: (Adams, 2006)
  • Two authors: (Adams and Brown, 2006)
  • Three or more authors: (Adamset al., 2006) Please note, ‘et al' should always be written in italics.

A few other style points. These apply to both the main body of text and your final list of references.

  • When referring to pages in a publication, use ‘p.(page number)’ for a single page or ‘pp.(page numbers)’ to indicate a page range.
  • Page numbers should always be written out in full, e.g. 175-179, not 175-9.
  • Where a colon or dash appears in the title of an article or book chapter, the letter that follows that colon or dash should always be lower case.
  • When citing a work with multiple editors, use the abbreviation ‘Ed.s’.

At the end of your paper, please supply a reference list in alphabetical order using the style guidelines below. Where a DOI is available, this should be included at the end of the reference.

For books

Surname, initials (year),title of book, publisher, place of publication.

e.g. Harrow, R. (2005),No Place to Hide, Simon & Schuster, New York, NY.

For book chapters

Surname, initials (year), "chapter title", editor's surname, initials(Ed.), title of book, publisher, place of publication, page numbers.

e.g. Calabrese, F.A. (2005), "The early pathways: theory to practice – a continuum", Stankosky, M. (Ed.),Creating the Discipline of Knowledge Management, Elsevier, New York, NY, pp.15-20.

For journals

Surname, initials (year), "title of article",journal name, volume issue, page numbers.

e.g. Capizzi, M.T. and Ferguson, R. (2005), "Loyalty trends for the twenty-first century",Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 22 No. 2, pp.72-80.

For published
conference proceedings

Surname, initials (year of publication), "title of paper", in editor’s surname, initials (Ed.),title of published proceeding which may include place and date(s) held, publisher, place of publication, page numbers.

e.g. Wilde, S. and Cox, C. (2008), “Principal factors contributing to the competitiveness of tourism destinations at varying stages of development”, in Richardson, S., Fredline, L., Patiar A., & Ternel, M. (Ed.s),CAUTHE 2008: Where the 'bloody hell' are we?, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Qld, pp.115-118.

For unpublished
conference proceedings

Surname, initials (year), "title of paper", paper presented at [name of conference], [date of conference], [place of conference], available at: URL if freely available on the internet (accessed date).

e.g. Aumueller, D. (2005), "Semantic authoring and retrieval within a wiki", paper presented at the European Semantic Web Conference (ESWC), 29 May-1 June, Heraklion, Crete, available at:http://dbs.uni-leipzig.de/file/aumueller05wiksar.pdf(accessed 20 February 2007).

For working papers

Surname, initials (year), "title of article", working paper [number if available], institution or organization, place of organization, date.

e.g. Moizer, P. (2003), "How published academic research can inform policy decisions: the case of mandatory rotation of audit appointments", working paper, Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, Leeds, 28 March.

For encyclopaedia entries
(with no author or editor)

Title of encyclopaedia(year), "title of entry", volume, edition, title of encyclopaedia, publisher, place of publication, page numbers.

e.g.Encyclopaedia Britannica(1926), "Psychology of culture contact", Vol. 1, 13th ed., Encyclopaedia Britannica, London and New York, NY, pp.765-771.

(for authored entries, please refer to book chapter guidelines above)

For newspaper
articles (authored)

Surname, initials (year), "article title",newspaper, date, page numbers.

e.g. Smith, A. (2008), "Money for old rope",Daily News, 21 January, pp.1, 3-4.

For newspaper
articles (non-authored)

Newspaper(year), "article title", date, page numbers.

e.g.Daily News(2008), "Small change", 2 February, p.7.

For archival or other unpublished sources

Surname, initials (year), "title of document", unpublished manuscript, collection name, inventory record, name of archive, location of archive.

e.g. Litman, S. (1902), "Mechanism & Technique of Commerce", unpublished manuscript, Simon Litman Papers, Record series 9/5/29 Box 3, University of Illinois Archives, Urbana-Champaign, IL.

For electronic sources

If available online, the full URL should be supplied at the end of the reference, as well as the date that the resource was accessed.

Surname, initials (year), “title of electronic source”, available at: persistent URL (accessed date month year).

e.g. Weida, S. and Stolley, K. (2013), “Developing strong thesis statements”, available at: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/588/1/ (accessed 20 June 2018)

Standalone URLs, i.e. those without an author or date, should be included either inside parentheses within the main text, or preferably set as a note (Roman numeral within square brackets within text followed by the full URL address at the end of the paper).

For data

Surname, initials (year),title of dataset, name of data repository, available at: persistent URL, (accessed date month year).

e.g. Campbell, A. and Kahn, R.L. (2015),American National Election Study, 1948, ICPSR07218-v4, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (distributor), Ann Arbor, MI, available at:https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07218.v4 (accessed 20 June 2018)

Submit your manuscript

There are a number of key steps you should follow to ensure a smooth and trouble-free submission.

Double check your manuscript

Before submitting your work, it is your responsibility to check that the manuscript is complete, grammatically correct, and without spelling or typographical errors. A few other important points:

  • Give the journal aims and scope a final read. Is your manuscript definitely a good fit? If it isn’t, the editor may decline it without peer review.
  • Does your manuscript comply with our research and publishing ethics guidelines?
  • Have you cleared any necessary publishing permissions?
  • Have you followed all the formatting requirements laid out in these author guidelines?
  • Does the manuscript contain any information that might help the reviewer identify you? This could compromise the anonymous peer review process. A few tips:
    • If you need to refer to your own work, use wording such as ‘previous research has demonstrated’ not ‘our previous research has demonstrated’.
    • If you need to refer to your own, currently unpublished work, don’t include this work in the reference list.
    • Any acknowledgments or author biographies should be uploaded as separate files.
    • Carry out a final check to ensure that no author names appear anywhere in the manuscript. This includes in figures or captions.

You will find a helpful submission checklist on the website Think.Check.Submit.

The submission process

All manuscripts should be submitted through our editorial systemby the corresponding author.

A separate author account is required for each journal you submit to. If this is your first time submitting to this journal, please choose the Create an account or Register now option in the editorial system. If you already have an Emerald login, you are welcome to reuse the existing username and password here.

Please note, the next time you log into the system, you will be asked for your username. This will be the email address you entered when you set up your account.

Don't forget to add yourORCiD ID during the submission process. It will be embedded in your published article, along with a link to the ORCiD registry allowing others to easily match you with your work.

Don’t have one yet? It only takes a few moments to register for a free ORCiD identifier.

During the submission process, you will have the opportunity to indicate whether you would like to publish your paper via the gold open access route.

Visit the ScholarOne support centrefor further help and guidance.

What you can expect next

You will receive an automated email from the journal editor, confirming your successful submission. It will provide you with a manuscript number, which will be used in all future correspondence about your submission. If you have any reason to suspect the confirmation email you receive might be fraudulent, please contact our Rights team on [emailprotected]

Post submission

Review and decision process

Each submission is checked by the editor. At this stage, they may choose to decline or unsubmit your manuscript if it doesn’t fit the journal aims and scope, or they feel the language/manuscript quality is too low.

If they think it might be suitable for the publication, they will send it to at least two independent referees for double anonymous peer review. Once these reviewers have provided their feedback, the editor may decide to accept your manuscript, request minor or major revisions, or decline your work.

While all journals work to different timescales, the goal is that the editor will inform you of their first decision within 60 days.

During this period, we will send you automated updates on the progress of your manuscript via our submission system, or you can log in to check on the current status of your paper. Each time we contact you, we will quote the manuscript number you were given at the point of submission. If you receive an email that does not match these criteria, it could be fraudulent and we recommend you email [emailprotected]

If your submission is accepted

Open access

If you’ve chosen to publish gold open access, this is the point you will be asked to pay the APC (article processing charge). This varies per journal and can be found on our APC price list or on the editorial system at the point of submission. Yourarticle will be published with a Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 user licence, which outlines how readers can reuse your work.

For UK journal article authors - if you wish to submit your work accepted by Emerald to REF 2021, you must make a ‘closed deposit’ of your accepted manuscript to your respective institutional repository upon acceptance of your article. Articles accepted for publication after 1st April 2018 should be deposited as soon as possible, but no later than three months after the acceptance date. For further information and guidance, please refer to the REF 2021 website.

(Video) Using Fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA) in Quantitative Research

Copyright

All accepted authors are sent an email with a link to a licence form. This should be checked for accuracy, for example whether contact and affiliation details are up to date and your name is spelled correctly, and then returned to us electronically. If there is a reason why you can’t assign copyright to us, you should discuss this with yourjournal content editor. You will find their contact details on the editorial team section above.

Proofing and typesetting

Once we have received your completed licence form, the article will pass directly into the production process. We will carry out editorial checks, copyediting, and typesetting and then return proofs to you (if you are the corresponding author) for your review. This is your opportunity to correct any typographical errors, grammatical errors or incorrect author details. We can’t accept requests to rewrite texts at this stage.

When the page proofs are finalised, the fully typeset and proofed version of record is published online. This is referred to as the EarlyCite version. While an EarlyCite article has yet to be assigned to a volume or issue, it does have a digital object identifier (DOI) and is fully citable. It will be compiled into an issue according to the journal’s issue schedule, with papers being added by chronological date of publication.

How to share your paper

Visit our authorrights pageto find out how you can reuse and share your work.

Tofind tips on increasing the visibility of your published paper, read abouthow to promote your work.

Correcting inaccuracies in your published paper

Sometimes errors are made during the research, writing and publishing processes. When these issues arise, we have the option of withdrawing the paper or introducing a correction notice. Find out more about ourarticle withdrawal and correction policies.

Need to make a change to the author list? See our frequently asked questions (FAQs)below.

Frequently asked questions

Is there a submission fee
for the journal?

The only time we will ever ask you for money to publish in an Emerald journal is if you have chosen to publish via the gold open accessroute. You will be asked to pay an APC (article processing charge) once your paper has been accepted (unless it is a sponsored open access journal).

Read about our APCs

At no other time will you be asked to contribute financially towards your article’s publication. If you haven’t chosen gold open access and you receive an email which appears to be from Emerald, asking you for payment to publish, please contact our Rights team on [emailprotected]

How can I become
a reviewer for a journal?

Please contact the editor for the journal, with a copy of your CV. You will find their contact details on the editorial team tab on this page.

Who do I contact if I want to find out which volume and issue my accepted paper will appear in?

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FAQs

What is comparative and international education? ›

The Comparative and International Education (CIE) Research Group is an internationally-recognised interdisciplinary group dedicated to the study of educational systems, practices, and policies around the world.

What is meant by comparative education? ›

Comparative education is a loosely bounded field that examines the sources, workings, and outcomes of education systems, as well as leading education issues, from comprehensive, multidisciplinary, cross-national, and cross-cultural perspectives.

What is Comparative Education PDF? ›

Comparative education is a fully established academic field of study that examines education in one country (or group of countries) by using data and insights drawn from the practices and situation in another country, or countries.

What are the 5 purposes of comparative education? ›

Purpose of Studying Comparative Education
  • For Intellectual Reasons. ...
  • Planning. ...
  • Practicability. ...
  • Humanitarian viewpoint. ...
  • Seeing Education in World Perspective. ...
  • Promotes Innovation in Education. ...
  • Economics of education. ...
  • Education for international understanding.
31 Aug 2018

Who is the father of comparative education? ›

In the history of comparative education Marc-Antoine Jullien de Paris is com- monly referred to as the "father of Comparative Education".

What are the four phases of comparative education? ›

Tuesday
  • DEVELOPMENT OF COMPARATIVE EDUCATION.
  • The Phase of Traveler's Tales.
  • The Phase of Selective Education Borrowing (1817-1900)
  • The Phase of Cultural Context or the Period of Philosophers (1900-1945)
  • The Phase of Social Science Perspectives -1945 to present.

What are the three stages of comparative education? ›

The historical development of comparative education can be divided into three stages. They are: descriptive stage, predictive stage and scientific stage.

What are the types of comparative education? ›

In the various methods of the study of comparative education the following are noteworthy Quantitative, Descriptive, Sociological, Historical, Analytical and Synthetic.

What is the aims of comparative education? ›

to enhance our knowledge of education in general; • to improve educational institutions; their content, processes and methods; • to understand the relationship between education and society; • to promote international understanding; • to find possible solutions to educational issues.

What are the benefits of comparative education? ›

Furthermore, comparative education can be very useful for identifying the best instructional models, academic standards, and policies of educational institutions that have already been used in different countries.

What are the important elements of comparative education? ›

Unit 04: Elements of Comparative Education (Both qualitative and quantitative dimensions)
  • 4.1. Objectives.
  • 4.2. Curricula.
  • 4.3. Teaching Methodology.
  • 4.4. Assessment and evaluation (student achievement, examination system)
  • 4.5. Facilities.
  • 4.6. Educational structure.
  • 4.7. Administrative and financial set up.
  • 4.8.

What are the problems of comparative education? ›

Most issues in comparative education are linked to the social, cultural, political, and economic realities of particular countries. These are further related to issues like equal opportunity, curriculum relevance among other issues which are all interpreted differently in different cultures and educational systems.

Which method is best for comparative education? ›

In any comparative study we have to use analysis. This is because through analysis one can separate the various elements and understand the importance of each independently. The analytical method is considered useful only when the social and educational organizations are compared.

What is the value of comparative education? ›

It studies why educational systems (structure, organization, curricula and financing) and processes vary, and how education relates to wider social factors and forces.

What are 3 types of education? ›

There are three main types of education, namely, Formal, Informal and Non-formal.

Who was the first person use the term comparative education? ›

This conception of Comparative Education was for the first time expounded by M. A. Jullien de Paris in 8I 7. It was also clearly expressed by the English pioneers of that subject, Matthew Arnold and Sir Michael Sadler.

What year did comparative education start? ›

Comparative education first appeared in the early 19th century alongside the rise of national education, though it did not develop as an academic subject until the 20th century. Its early development was hampered by the two World Wars, where it was used for ideological competition.

What are the 5 levels of education? ›

Early childhood education is followed by primary school (called elementary school in the United States), middle school, secondary school (called high school in the United States), and then postsecondary (tertiary) education.

What are the 5 stages of education? ›

Educational stages are subdivisions of formal learning, typically covering early childhood education, primary education, secondary education and tertiary education.

What are the seven methods of comparative education? ›

Stages in Noah and Eckstein's Scientific Method

The process involved seven critical stages: identification of the problem, development of a hypothesis, definitions of concepts and indicators, selection for cases of study, collection of data, manipulation of data, and interpretation of the result.

What are the two types of comparative? ›

There are several methods of doing comparative analysis and Tilly (1984) distinguishes four types of comparative analysis namely: individualizing, universalizing, variation-finding and encompassing (p. 82).

What is the importance of comparative education to teachers? ›

For teachers, an understanding of the comparative education literature helps [teachers reflect] on issues of concern in their own classrooms such as diversity, conflict/peace, teaching approaches, curriculum and classroom organization in a wider global context…

What is the meaning of international education? ›

What is international education? International education is about the mobility of students and scholars who go to another part of the world to study, research, or teach.

What is meant by international education? ›

International education refers to a dynamic concept that involves a journey or movement of people, minds, or ideas across political and cultural frontiers. It is facilitated by the globalization phenomenon, which increasingly erases the constraints of geography on economic, social and cultural arrangements.

What is an international education degree? ›

A masters degree in international education is a post graduate degree program designed to prepare educators to pursue careers in international and multinational settings.

What is the full meaning of comparative? ›

Definition of comparative

1 : of, relating to, or constituting the degree of comparison in a language that denotes increase in the quality, quantity, or relation expressed by an adjective or adverb The comparative form of happy is happier. The comparative form of clearly is more clearly.

What is the main aim of international education? ›

The world of international education is a melting pot of individuals and learning with a global perspective ensures students are exposed to different cultures, ethnic groups, religions and languages, enriching society in the process and broadening the academic experience for everyone.

Which country is best for international education? ›

  • SWITZERLAND. ...
  • SINGAPORE. ...
  • CHINA. ...
  • JAPAN. ...
  • AUSTRALIA. ...
  • SOUTH KOREA. ...
  • CANADA. ...
  • GERMANY. Boasting a variety of excellent universities like the Technical University of Munich, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Freie Universitat Berlin – and more – Germany is a fantastic option for international students.
2 Sept 2022

Who is the founder of international education? ›

Founders Stephen Duggan, Sr. and Nobel laureates Elihu Root and Nicholas Murray Butler envisioned IIE as a central coordinating hub to establish political, economic, and cultural collaboration between students, scholars, and institutions worldwide.

What is the theme of international education Day 2022? ›

International Day of Education 2022 will be celebrated under the theme “Changing Course, Transforming Education.” The celebration, led by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), aims to showcase the most important transformations that have to be nurtured to realize everyone's fundamental ...

What are the challenges of international education? ›

Some of the challenges faced by international students are a language barrier, culture shock, homesickness, or financial issues.

Is international degree useful? ›

An international relations degree isn't only useful for working directly in international relations. You get a lot of transferable skills along the way that can be valuable in almost any industry, even if you never step foot out of CONUS again! You'll walk away with at least one foreign language, for instance.

What is a career in international education? ›

Examples of where international educators work

Work in an international student office, education abroad office, or foreign language and TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) department. There are many specializations within each office /department such as advisers, teachers, specialists, and counselors.

How can I work abroad with an education degree? ›

Education Jobs Abroad
  1. Government Sponsored Programs. Many foreign governments actively recruit native English speakers to come to their countries to teach English with the public school system. ...
  2. Teaching Placement Programs. ...
  3. Teaching a subject BESIDES English. ...
  4. Recruitment. ...
  5. Other Jobs.

What are the 3 types of comparative? ›

CAS offers three comparative modes: intra-regional, cross-regional, and trans-regional. A number of scholars have used CAS's comparative rubrics, even without knowing about the wider CAS agenda and program.

What are the two types of comparative? ›

There are several methods of doing comparative analysis and Tilly (1984) distinguishes four types of comparative analysis namely: individualizing, universalizing, variation-finding and encompassing (p. 82).

What is the objective of comparative? ›

Objectives of Comparative Financial Statements are :To make the Data Simpler and More Understandable : The main aim of preparing Comparative Financial Statements is to put the Data for a number of years in Simpler and Comparable Form .

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